Michelle Isenhoff

Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! by Laura Amy Schlitz

I’ve avoided this book for years. It was published in 2007 and won the Newbery in 2008, but it didn’t appeal to me. I like the history of the middle ages; it was one of my favorite courses in college. Still, I never picked this one up. Maybe it was the cover image. More likely, […]

The Captain's Dog, by Roland Smith

This is the story of Lewis and Clark as told by Seaman, Captain Lewis’s Newfoundland dog who accompanied the Corps of Discovery on their epic journey to the Pacific Ocean in 1804-6. I’d seen this book before and was very intrigued. I love history. I’ve taught this subject several times for homeschool as each of […]

The Break (Tales of a Revolution), by Lars D. Hedbor

  As you know by now, I’m a history addict and a fan of Lars Hedbor’s historical fiction series, Tales of a Revolution. Over spring break, I had the honor of reading two of his latest releases. The first, The Wind, posted right after I read it. This is the second. It’s sort of fitting that it’s posting on […]

The Wind, by Lars D. Hedbor

Before I start a four-post series about the research of Blood Moon next week, I’m sneaking in a review of my favorite book I’ve read since finishing the manuscript. And I’m reading a LOT of them right now. I’ve become a dedicated Lars Hedbor fan. In his Tales of a Revolution series, he takes little-known stories of […]

Flying the Dragon, by Natalie Dias Lorenzi

Skye has a cousin, Hiroshi, she has never met. Because Hiroshi lives in Japan, and Skye was born in America. But when Grandfather grows ill, Skye’s Japanese relatives move to America for Grandfather’s treatment. Skye is embarrassed to have Hiroshi in class with her. He can’t speak English well. He’s completely unaware how “uncool” he […]

Blood on the River, by Elisa Carbone

I discovered this book several years ago, when I was looking for historical fiction to suppliment an American history class I was teaching to my then-homeschooled daughter. I’ve just finished reading it with both of my boys for the same class. I’m still impressed. This is the story of Jamestown, told through the eyes of […]

Constance, A Story of Early Plymouth, by Patricia Clapp, 1968

Constance Hopkins was a passenger onboard the Mayflower. The daughter of Stephen Hopkins, neither she nor her father were part of the congregation of Separatist we commonly call Pilgrims but members of the Virginia Company. At least Steven was. Constance was merely fourteen when she made the journey. This is her story, the tale of […]

The Invention of Wings, by Sue Monk Kidd

This book isn’t exactly children’s literature, though it is appropriate for a young adult audience. I’m featuring it today because its subject is so incredibly intertwined with that of my latest book, Ella Wood. In fact, The Invention of Wings was recommended to me by two of my blog readers after I began sharing snipets of […]

A Long Walk to Water, by Linda Sue Park

This is the remarkable story of Salva Dut, a survivor of the Sudanese Civil War that raged from 1983-2002. Salva spent years walking, avoiding the war, living in refuge camps—surviving. He was one of the lucky ones who eventually migrated to America. He then chose to return to drought-ridden Sudan and drill wells in poor […]

Scroll to top