Michelle Isenhoff

science fiction

Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, 1818, Book Review

I’m not a fan of horror, but the first time I read Frankenstein, it left me, well, horrified, but in pleasant sort of way. It was such a tragedy. I felt such sympathy and revulsion for both Victor and his monster. I was astonished at the monster’s feelings. Who would ever consider his point of […]

Journey to the Center of the Earth, by Jules Verne, 1864, Book Review

I finally finished this one! I started last fall, then a thousand projects seemed to take precedence. Five months later, I started over and read with a vengeance, finishing easily in just two days. It’s a fun story, full of typical Verne science and adventure. No wonder it’s a classic. Henry Lawson lives and studies […]

The Death Cure (The Maze Runner Trilogy, book 3), by James Dashner, 2011

Start with my reviews of The Maze Runner (book one) and The Scorch Trials (book two). The Death Cure delivers the exciting conclusion to the Maze Runner Trilogy. (It’s better than book two.) Thomas and his friends have escaped the Maze and survived the Scorch, but are the trials really over? WICKED has told them they are, but […]

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, by Jules Verne, 1870, Book Review

Jules Verne’s undersea adventure classic is a smooth blend of science and fantasy, so smooth I had to do a little research to verify where the line blurs. Written as a first person account (the narrator is a scientist), it contains many facts and figures “proving” observations with natural law. Many facts and figures. And […]

Jules Verne (1828-1905), Author Biography

Before this year, I never read a book by Jules Verne. I read lots and lots of American and British classics for my English major, but Verne was French. I’ve been missing out! Since I’ve enjoyed two of his book this summer and added a third to my to-read list, I thought I’d learn a little more about him. […]

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