Michelle Isenhoff

What Dreams May Come, by Beth Honeycutt

I read and reviewed What Dreams May Come at the request of the author, whom I had met online through the Clean Indie Reads group this past spring. I really enjoyed it! As an afterthought, I realized it would also be totally appropriate to feature here on Bookworm Blather. I was a little hesitant to pick this […]

The Smoke, by Lars D. H. Hedbor

I’m thrilled to announce the January release of the latest edition in Lars Hedbor’s Tales of a Revolution series. I’ve come to be pretty good friends with Lars, but it’s a friendship that began through a shared love of American history and mutual respect for each other’s work. In 2013, dissatisfied with a small press, […]

Journey to the Center of the Earth, by Jules Verne, 1864, Book Review

I finally finished this one! I started last fall, then a thousand projects seemed to take precedence. Five months later, I started over and read with a vengeance, finishing easily in just two days. It’s a fun story, full of typical Verne science and adventure. No wonder it’s a classic. Henry Lawson lives and studies […]

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, by JK Rowling, 2000, Book Review

This is one seriously long book! As much as I love the story–this is my third time through and I’m delighted all over again because my brain just doesn’t retain details–one of my few complaints is that it is so long. I know more than one kid who has balked at its length. Personally, because […]

The Battle of the Labyrinth (Percy Jackson and the Olympians), Rick Riordan, 2008, Book Review

This fourth book in Riordan’s Percy Jackson & the Olympians series is vastly entertaining, as always. Within, Percy and his friends must enter the huge labyrinth that is under the surface of the earth, just beneath the mortal world. Grover goes in search of Pan, whom he is convinced is hiding out, to substantiate his claim […]

Cassidy Jones and Vulcan's Gift, by Elise Stokes, 2011, Book Review

I’m excited to be in on the release of Elise Stokes’ second novel, Cassidy Jones and Vulcan’s Gift. This fast-paced series is reminiscent of the adventures of comic book superheroes, except Cassidy Jones happens to be a totally hip, totally stubborn, totally modern fifteen-year-old girl. A freak accident left her with enhanced senses and superhuman […]

The Iron King, by Julie Kagawa, 2010, Book Review

“We were born of the dreams and fears of mortals…” The fey, the immortal, the faeries–they’ve always been out there, but Meghan never saw them till the day she turned sixteen. The day they came for her four-year-old brother. This delightful new tale draws from a pair of Shakespearean plays. Oberon, Titiana and Puck, from […]

Ship Breaker, by Paolo Bacigalupi, 2010, Book Review

After having this book recommended to me, I was extremely disappointed. Don’t get me wrong. It’s not that it isn’t exciting. It’s not that Mr. Bacigalupi doesn’t drive a high-caliber story. And it’s not that he doesn’t create quality characters. But it’s sinister, gory, and Mr. Bacigalupi can’t go one paragraph without the word d—.  He […]

Surviving Me, by Reginald Raab, Book Review

If you are a boy, if you’ve ever been a boy, if you have sons or brothers, you will laugh out loud as you read this book.  Reginald Raab, language arts teacher at Pine Street Elementary, draws on some of his own experiences to create this most outrageous story.  From a bee sting/first date catastrophe, […]

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